Saint of the Month

St. Leo the Great: Feast Day: Nov. 10

A man of peace. A pastoral pope and a preacher. A staunch defender of doctrine. Pope St. Leo the Great managed to fill these disparate roles ably and with unshakeable faith.

In the fifth century, Italy was besieged by waves of barbarian invasions, imperial rulers were losing power, and arguments were erupting between bishops in the Eastern and Western Churches. The times called for a strong leader in Rome – and the Church got one in Pope Leo I, who was pope from 440-461 A.D.

St. Pius X

Feast Day: Aug. 21

When St. Pius X was named pope in 1903, he used the words of St. Paul to state his most fervent desire: “to restore all things in Christ.” (Eph 1:10) How was this to be achieved? Through education – by teaching Christian doctrine to the young and the old, to the rich and the poor. He felt religious devotion was devoid of meaning unless people understood their faith.

St. Joan of Arc, patron saint of France

Feast Day: May 30

Thanks to movies, books and popular legend, St. Joan of Arc seems more familiar than many saints because we have seen her depicted as a male soldier, wearing military armor. But did you know that this courageous peasant girl from the 15th century, who helped drive the English from French territory during their long-running war, never had any military training? Did you know she never learned how to read or write? And in spite of no formal religious training, Joan of Arc was able to speak eloquently about theology and her faith at her trial.

Saint María Josefa of the Heart of Jesus

Feast Day - March 20

Saint María Josefa felt called to religious life at a young age growing up in nineteenth-century Spain, initially believing she was called to join a monastery and live a contemplative life. But when she was just 18, María realized she had a vocation to a more active religious calling. She originally joined the Institute of the Servants of Mary, but soon discovered her call was more specific, and she needed to focus on the sick in both hospitals and in their homes.

St. Virginia Centurione Bracelli

Virginia Centurione, born into a noble family in Genoa, Italy, in 1587, was forced into marriage at a young age, despite her wish to live a religious life. She had two daughters, Leila and Isabella. But her husband died when she was just 20 years old, which allowed her to devote her life to abandoned children and the needs of the elderly, the sick and the poor. Because of war in the region in 1624-25, many in her city were orphaned, hungry and unable to find work. St. Virginia was canonized in 2003 by St.

St. Charles Borromeo, A tireless reformer

Feast Day: November 4

Born amidst the turmoil of the Protestant Reformation and troubled sixteenth-century Italy, Charles Borromeo set his sights on reform from a young age, and helped to reinvigorate the Church during the Counter-Reformation. Born into a wealthy and powerful family in northern Italy in 1538, he joined the ranks of the clergy at age 12. While preparing for a career in the Church, Charles was given the income from a rich Benedictine abbey by an uncle, and he insisted that all funds not used for his education be given to the poor.

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